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'Tunes on the Tundra' turns up despite change in plans

The American hip-hop artist performs his most popular music on Sept. 30, providing a night of fun and excitement. The event was sponsored by Ohio Northern's Student Senate.

Asher Roth performs at 2016 'Tunes on the Tundra'

The American hip-hop artist performs his most popular music on Sept. 30, providing a night of fun and excitement. The event was sponsored by Ohio Northern's Student Senate.

The stage was set, and the lights went down in anticipation for a night of thrill featuring American hip-hop artist Asher Roth on Sept. 30 at the King-Horn Sports Center on Ohio Northern University’s campus. The concert, dubbed as “Tunes on the Tundra,” was sponsored by ONU’s Student Senate.

Earlier this spring, Student Senate sent a survey to the student body, listing several artists from which they could vote for to be at the concert. Originally, Lil Dicky was the winner; however, problems arose when the rapper went on tour over the summer, causing his price to be frozen. When he returned, Student Senate Vice President and fourth-year pharmacy student Tyler Davis said the artist asked for roughly five times the original amount it cost to book him for the show, forcing Student Senate to turn down the offer and arrange to book another artist.

“We budget for the concert about half of the operating budget for the year,” Davis said. “We could have gotten some of the acts after the initial offer, but we wanted to actually be able to fund the student organizations as well as do the concert.”

The official word that Roth would be featured at the second annual Tunes on the Tundra concert was made on Sept. 2 with ticket sales following soon after the announcement.

Although originally priced at $15, the lack of sales urged Student Senate to hold a flash sale. The price was reduced to $5 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sept. 28 in hopes of increasing interest and crowd size. The next day, the price was officially dropped to $5, and after 6 p.m. on Sept. 30, the price rose to $10.

In total, 250 tickets were sold, and an additional 50 were given away to student volunteers. As a result, Student Senate raised $1,200, all of which was given back for the concert.

“The only thing we were trying to make back was the commission on the artist,” Davis said. “We didn’t spend any more than what we budgeted for, so whatever we spent is the max that we [budgeted]. Anything else that we made off of it just gives us a little more money.”

Davis said the concert was a success despite various complications and initial backlash from the student body.

“From what I’ve heard, everyone who went had a great time. They were very happy with how Asher Roth performed,” he said. “And then what I heard from the people who didn’t come and saw the videos on Facebook and stuff, they [said they] kind of wished they would have come.”

Dr. Adriane Thompson-Bradshaw agreed with the success of the concert, admiring how well Student Senate handled the change in plans on such a short notice.

“I guess I would gage success by the opinion of the organizers—the students who put the most work into it—so Stephanie, taking the lead on it as the Forum Secretary, and Tyler and Drew,” she said. “And they were all very, very pleased, so I would say it was a success. I think it’s always tricky to do a concert so soon after coming back in the fall because you have to hit the ground running. You really don’t have much time, and getting the word out is something that really takes time because you kind of have to saturate people with hearing about the concert.”

All in all, the concert was deemed a success by the majority of the executive board of Student Senate. Whether or not the student body did is another story. Davis said he understood the students’ disappointment.

“We knew Asher was going to put on a good show,” he said. “It was just getting the students on board to know that he can do a good show and to get people on board. It is kind of disheartening that their first choice isn’t coming and that someone just replaced your idea to come. We really did try to get student feedback, and it just didn’t work out the way it was planned.”