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The Northern Review: Then and Now

The Northern Review has changed a lot over the years, especially since 1920. While the look has changed, the goal to deliver the best news at Ohio Northern University remains the same. Newspaper footage courtesy of Heterick Memorial Library (Northern Review photo/Kasy Long)

Ohio Northern University’s campus newspaper, The Northern Review, has been serving the Ada community since 1915, replacing the original newspaper, The Northern Light. The latter newspaper first appeared in 1912, and it was printed as both a newspaper and a magazine.

But unfortunately, The Northern Light was abolished on May 26, 1914 after the editorial staff ran afoul of then-President Smith. This editorial position listed multiple claims against the university’s President, asking students to sign a petition to force him to resign.

Even though this occurred, representatives of the junior and senior classes wrote to the Board of Trustees in 1915 to re-establish a student newspaper for the campus community, and this became the current The Northern Review. These journalists promised never to print upsetting articles, developing a “Board of Censors” group to monitor each article being edited for publication.

These young editors aimed to make The Northern Review a source of helpfulness for the Ada community, rather than a place for anger and biased opinions. This promise was enough to persuade the administration to move forward with publication plans in 1915. Since then, The Northern Review has been in print with the only exception of a brief hiatus during WWII.

In 2014, the current online version replaced the weekly hardcopy version of the paper. Two print papers are published each academic school year—to pay homage to the work of previous editorial staffs.

For this article, The Northern Review is taking a walk down memory lane by looking at the top headlines from past issues of the newspaper. This nostalgic trip will showcase how far the newspaper has come, and how far it still needs to go.